At nearly every doctor's visit, your doctor should (and likely will) remind you to make sure you're drinking enough water. Why? Because drinking clean water is one of the safest and most effective ways of lowering your risk for common diseases like heart disease.

Stats about heart disease in the US

In the U.S., heart disease is the leading cause of death. More than 600,000 people die from heart disease, equating to roughly 1 in 4 deaths. It is now the leading cause of death amongst both men and women. Though are many way to prevent heart disease including lowering blood pressure and diet and exercise, a recent study by Loma Linda University Health suggests that "both men an women who drank five or more glasses of water per day had about half the risk of dying of coronary heart disease."

 

Hypertension and High Cholesterol – How Water Links the Two

Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is a serious medical condition, that left untreated can lead to heart disease, heart failure, strokes, as well as many other serious health conditions. Around one-third of adults in the US actually suffer from hypertension, with may of them not aware that they have it and therefore living undiagnosed. A simple blood pressure test can determine whether or not you are living with hypertension or if you are in the early stages of developing it.

What can high blood pressure cause?

High Cholesterol, or hyperlipidemia, also drastically increases your chance for developing the above health issues like heart disease, heart failure or strokes. Like hypertension, many people live undiagnosed because they are not showing any of the common signs or symptoms. Evidence shows that for every decade an individual has elevated cholesterol before they are 55 years old, it increases the risk of heart-related illnesses by 40%. 

While the most common risk reduction or treatment for both hypertension and high cholesterol are changes to your diet and exercise, one very easy and often overlooked change is to drink more clean water.

 

Why does drinking water help with heart disease?

The human body is made up of more than 60% water. Your heart is even more than that, coming in at about 73% (same as the brain actually). With many studies proving the health benefits of water when it comes to overall health, but has there been a consensus on the affects fo drinking water and the heart specifically? 

How to treat heart disease

Scientists are very aware of the effects of high sodium levels leading to an increased risk of heart disease. And with less liquids, or water, in your body, resulting in dehydration, the sodium levels in your blood would rise. Because of this there exists a direct relationship between healthy cholesterol levels and drinking water too. If we do not drink a sufficient amount of water on a daily basis, the kidneys and other organs are unable to properly function. If the blood is to flow properly around the body, sufficient water is required, particularly following meals when the nutrients from food need to flow to the body’s cells.

If there is not enough water, the body is unable to remove any excess cholesterol properly from the arteries, and this increases the chance of developing coronary heart disease or having a stroke.

 

What about a water filter?

The main purpose of a filter is to remove toxins out of the water you are looking to filter. Most tap water contains hundreds of toxins and chemicals that standard water filters are unable to remove (but you know this because you chose Clearly Filtered!). When a filter doesn't remove various contaminants, it turns your body into the filter. 

As you drink water, the water and various chemicals and toxins are absorbed into your body and into your blood stream where they eventually hit your kidneys (the body's filters). Putting too much stress on these vital organs can lead to them not performing at optimal levels, leaving many toxins in your blood to travel throughout your body and into your other organs. 

This proves the need for an impressive and effective water filter. If studies show that drinking more water per day can significantly lower your chance for heart disease, why wouldn't you take it upon yourself to drink the highest quality water? Drinking water that is riddled with chemicals and toxins, or using a inferior water filter will only solve one problem while creating others. 

The next question, if you believe you have a robust water filter (like Clearly Filtered), is to ask yourself are you changing your filter often enough? It is crucial for the filter to be changed in a timely manner in order to ensure you are always removing the toxins and contaminants that could cause harm to your body over time. As Momma always said, "better safe than sorry."

 

What We've Learned 

If you’ve never realized that water and heart health were interlinked, you certainly aren’t alone. The good news, however, is that even for those who had no idea there was a connection, since most of us know the importance of staying well-hydrated it’s likely that many of us were getting enough water anyway. Still, now you’re aware of the association, you can make doubly sure to drink those 8 glasses of water each and every day to make sure that you really are getting your essential quota – not just for your overall well-being, but to protect your heart as well.

 

READ NEXT: What Water Filter System is Best For Renters?

 

https://www.cdc.gov/heartdisease/facts.htm

https://lluh.org/sites/medical-center.lomalindahealth.org/files/docs/LIVE-IT-Knutsen-Article-Water-Other-Fluids.pdf

 

  • Posted byRyan Fair /

Comments

  • Posted On April 12, 2019 by Jan Erks

    I have to drink a lot of because I had a heart transplant 20 years ago. I have been told to drink a lot since the beginning. We rent an hate chlorine in my or fluoride. Thank we love this system 😇

  • Posted On April 05, 2019 by Ronald Gumphry

    Very useful inofrmation. I tell everyone I know about Clearly Filtered water. THe best!

  • Posted On April 05, 2019 by Julie G

    I always knew if the doctor was telling me to exercise and change my diet that water must have played a big role too. The study you linked is very interesting. My goal is to get off my medication for HBP. Going to drink a lot more water now.

  • Posted On April 05, 2019 by Bob Miller

    Wow! Who knew?! Thanks for this great info

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